Jump to Pull Quotes for School for Sidekicks, Broken Blade, Bared Blade, Crossed Blades, Blade Reforged, Drawn Blades, Darkened Blade, WebMage, Cybermancy, CodeSpell, MythOS, SpellCrash, Short Stories.

STARRED REVIEWS:

Publisher’s Weekly Starred Review, School For Sidekicks May 18 2015

Adult author McCullough (the Fallen Blade series) offers a rousing parody of superhero tales in his first book for children.

Evan’s smartass narration, dangerous run-ins with evil Hoods, tough moral quandaries, and a wild range of superpowered heroes and villains—including Blurshift, a genderfluid shapeshifer, and the Fluffinator, who commands an army of “plush collectibles” (don’t call them teddy bears)—make this an excellent choice for any reader awaiting the next Marvel film.

…an excellent choice for any reader awaiting the next Marvel film.

 Kirkus Starred Review, School for Sidekicks, April 1 2015

Readers will savor his triumph as well as the melodramatic plot and the cast’s rib-tickling array of “metahumans,” including the unfortunately named Hotflash, HeartBurn, the dangerous Fromagier (Evan: “Sweet barking cheese, Foxman!”), and the shape- and gender-shifting Blur. Leaps the tottering stack of similar “sidekick” novels in a single bound.

Leaps the tottering stack of similar “sidekick” novels in a single bound.

Publishers Weekly Starred Review, WebMage June 26th, 2006 page 38:

Remember the Fates, those ancient Greek spinners, weavers and snippers of life’s threads- They’re back in McCullough’s original and outstanding debut, and still ruling destiny–but with their own digital web, based on a server called the Fate Core. . . .

…let loose in McCullough’s delightfully skewed and fully formed world-much like our own, but with magic, paranormally advanced technology and Greek gods

McCullough handles his plot with unfailing invention, orchestrating a mixture of humor, philosophy and programming insights that give new meaning to terms as commonplace as spell checker and esoteric as programming in hex.

This is the kind of title that could inspire an army of rabid fans; it’s a good thing a sequel is planned for 2007.

School for Sidekicks

Publisher’s Weekly Starred Review May 18 2015

Adult author McCullough (the Fallen Blade series) offers a rousing parody of superhero tales in his first book for children.

Evan’s smartass narration, dangerous run-ins with evil Hoods, tough moral quandaries, and a wild range of superpowered heroes and villains—including Blurshift, a genderfluid shapeshifer, and the Fluffinator, who commands an army of “plush collectibles” (don’t call them teddy bears)—make this an excellent choice for any reader awaiting the next Marvel film.

…an excellent choice for any reader awaiting the next Marvel film.

Kirkus Starred Review April 1 2015

Readers will savor his triumph as well as the melodramatic plot and the cast’s rib-tickling array of “metahumans,” including the unfortunately named Hotflash, HeartBurn, the dangerous Fromagier (Evan: “Sweet barking cheese, Foxman!”), and the shape- and gender-shifting Blur. Leaps the tottering stack of similar “sidekick” novels in a single bound.

Leaps the tottering stack of similar “sidekick” novels in a single bound.

Children’s Literature – Lois Rubin Gross Spring 2015

There is so much to recommend about this wonderful adventure tale.

McCullough manages to give words to a very visual story about good guys and bad guys and how we cannot trust our first impressions.

Evan and his friends at Hero High are pretty normal adolescents caught in extraordinary circumstances, much as a famous young wizard once was in the “Harry Potter” series.

The classes Evan and his friends take are irresistible, such as “Dining Utensils as Defensive Weapons.”

…young readers will be clamoring to find out what happens next to Meerkat and the students at Hero High.

School Library Journal March 1 2015 (Jessica Marie, Salem Public Library, OR)

 …a likable protagonist, and the story is infused with equal measures of wit and action.

VERDICT This will appeal to middle grade readers looking for slightly campy superhero stories.

The Buffalo News, Books in Brief, August 23, 2015, Jean Westmoore

The author of the Fallen Blade fantasy novels for adults makes a sparkling debut for middle-grade readers in this entertaining, expertly crafted parody of superhero adventures.

The superheroes he creates are inspired, from Blurshift and Backflash to the Fluffinator and Mr. Implausible, who first appears as a pair of disembodied giant lips.

…a vivid setting of high-tech wonders and page-turning suspense, and you have a real summer treat.

School Library Journal, Teen Librarian Toolbox, August 24, 2015 by Robin Willis

…not just another book where a kid discovers he has super powers.

Mix in an isolated school, a washed out superhero mentor, and multiple twists and turns, and you have a thoroughly engaging, thought provoking read.

One of my favorite aspects of this novel is how all of the characters are complex and multifaceted (as well as ethnically diverse.)

A highly recommended novel for all middle school collections – especially where superheroes are popular – although isn’t that everywhere?

VOYA, August 2015 (Vol. 38, No. 3) – Rebecca Moore

This thoughtful superhero book will appeal to readers who prefer world- and character-building over action.

Evan is a compelling character, whose internal wrestling with his parents’ rejection of his ambitions, his loss of faith in the cowardly Captain Commanding, and his determination to do good ring true.

His interesting world overflows with unusual, humorous, and creative superpowers that go beyond simple strength.

Huntress Reviews, Detra Fitch, August 2015

FIVE STARS!

McCullough’s diabolic gaze lifts from the Adult Fantasy genre and shifts to the Young Adult Fantasy genre, where he will (no doubt) contaminate the minds of the next generation of readers; those lucky ducks!

The target audience is listed as grades four and up; however, I urge anyone past their teenage years to pick up this title as well. (My husband and I love this story!)

…there is a lot more going on that I tell in my synopsis. I actually feel sorry of anyone who misses out on this gem! Outstanding!

This Blonde Reads, March 29 2015

If you like superhero stories that aren’t about the big names and instead are about the regular guy learning how to be the hero then you’ll enjoy Evan’s story.

Kiss the Book April 8 2015

Nice origin story for metahumans with a very interesting destiny.

Evan is bright and personable and I enjoyed getting to know him and watching him interact with all of the various personalities around him.

This should help the sidekick/superpowers theme gain some steam.

Utopia Never Comes Young Adult Book Reviews Dec 17 2014 

This is an insanely witty & entertaining book geared for Young Readers, but smart & funny enough for Readers of ANY age.

It takes me back to being a child with the comic books I grew up on…

…I think this could be the book that brings an avid reader to a new world of Graphics or an avid Graphic Novel reader to a new world of books.

This book will have something for every reader.

It reminds me in part of many different series I have loved. It has the school life that reminds me in part to Harry Potter, the Hero teamwork you would find in any X-men-esque book, the subplot…

The Reading Nook Reviews, August 31 2015

School for Sidekicks is a fun, energetic look at an alternate universe where Masks (good guys!) and Hoods (bad guys!) dominate Heropolis.

Kelly McCullough has written a hilarious, amazing story about thirteen-year-old Evan Quick.

From the very first page, it’s impossible to resist McCullough’s superb prose and world-building.

He writes with a breezy confidence as he introduces us to Evan and the history of his metahuman-filled world…

The School for Sidekicks is hilarious, well-thought out and written with zest and wit.

Kelly McCullough has not only written a great book analyzing just what it means to be a superhero and sidekick in the modern world, but the various ramifications that come along with those responsibilities.

I seriously can’t wait to see if there’s a sequel – please say yes, Macmillan! – and am also counting down to the days that Hollywood discovers this gem, and adapts it.

SciFiChick, SciFi Book Review: School for Sidekicks, August 14, 2015

School for Sidekicks is a fun and fantastic book for young X-Men fans.

…plenty of humor, mystery, intrigue, fun characters, codenames, and action.

I’m hoping this release gets a series, but it works well as a standalone too.

The excitement builds to a big finale that doesn’t disappoint.

Ms. Yingling Reads Website Review, August 4 2015, Ms. Yingling

Strengths: This starts with a lot of video game references AND has superheroes. For some of readers, this is absolutely a slam dunk.

This has believable world building, very fun details (I loved the DenMother, a computer that could cook!), and supportive parents.

Hooray for nondepressing adventure books!

Dawn’s Read Love Kid’s Corner Review, August 10 2015, Jennifer Michelle:

This is the book that should teach middle grade readers the word parody. That is, if they can stop turning pages long enough to think about what they’re reading.

…one can almost see KAPOW! BANG! and OOOF! splashing across the page during the fight scenes. Indeed, near the end we’re treated to an explosive “BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOM!“

4 of 5 Hearts. A Fast-Paced, Rewarding Superhero Parody.

School for Sidekicks is a lively ride and should be entertaining fare for any kid who dreams of being a superhero…

Buxton’s Fantasy and Science Fiction Novels Review, August 25, 2015

…the mystery behind OSIRIS, the character interactions, and the adventure and action scenes resulted in a wonderful plot.

Overall, it’s an entertaining book for lovers of superheroes.

Read Sleep Repeat Website Reviews

Evan’s story was a lot of fun and I can definitely see middle grade readers going crazy for it.

Overall, School for Sidekicks is a fun book about what it means to be a real hero. The twists are totally unexpected and fascinating.

I highly recommend it to 8-12 year olds looking to get more into the YA world and for any fans of superheroes!

Skye’s Scribblings Book Review Blog, September 14, 2015

Being a hero isn’t always what it’s cracked up to be in this funny and genuine novel from adult fantasy author Kelly McCullough.

A campy but also complex Middle Grade that explores the hero-villain dynamic.

The story was an interesting mix of mockery and morality…

The writing was playful, with occasional sound effects and even a little breaking of the fourth wall, which worked well for the Middle Grade book.

A fun but also thoughtful superhero adventure that I really quite enjoyed!

Definitely recommend for anyone who likes a good superhero story with some camp.

While School for Sidekicks is currently a standalone, there is definitely more to Evan’s story that I feel needs to be told – keeping my fingers crossed for a sequel!

 Reader of Fictions dot com, July 28, 2015,

School for Sidekicks is a fun middle grade superhero book.

It’s got a lot of great humor based on tropes from all the superhero pop culture out there…

What really makes School for Sidekicks stand apart for me is the diversity. There’s casual mention of Evan’s dad’s two mothers, for example. One of the kids, Blurshift, has a power that allows them to shift genders and Blurshift has yet to choose a gender or standard form, which is so cool.

If there is another book in the series, I’m down for it.

Fangirl Knits Scarf Blog Review, August 5, 2015, Erika Ensign

School for Sidekicks is a delightful middle-grade* novel about Evan Quick, a boy who wants desperately to become a hero (aka a “Mask”).

It’s got plenty to recommend it to adult readers (especially geeks like me).

The story is much more than a simple new-high-school story.

And of course, if you have kids, send it their way and let me be jealous of them for discovering it so much earlier than I could.

Broken Blade:

SFReviews.net Thomas Wagner, December 2011

Kelly (WebMage) McCullough’s Broken Blade is one of those satisfying little page-turners that reminds us all that the backbone of genre fiction has always lain not among its heavily-hyped epics and bestsellers so much as its trusty mass market paperback midlist.

McCullough’s atmospheric little tale of betrayal and skullduggery is brisk, confident, intelligently-conceived and suspenseful.

McCullough evokes a rich and textured setting of back alleys, rooftop hideouts, dank dungeons and urban magical grime.

McCullough’s new series is looking like one sharp blade indeed.

 Huntress Reviews, Detra Fitch, Nov 30 2011

FIVE STARS! This is the first of a new series filled with multifaceted characters, layered plots, and the type of quixotic scenarios that only the imagination of Kelly McCullough could possibly create.

The main characters are magical and each has a unique familiar with various abilities that they share with their human.

Stories by Kelly McCullough are one-of-a-kind

I found Aral’s world to be compelling and highly addictive. Brilliant!

Fresh Fiction, Leanne Davis, January 15, 2012

 Kelly McCullough builds a fascinating world with some intriguing characters to keep a reader’s interest.

BROKEN BLADE is a compelling read that was hard to put down.

The reader will find themselves drawn to Aral.

Mr. McCullough has the ability to make the even his dastardly characters sympathetic.

Fantasy Book Review, Joshua S Hill, June 2nd 2015

…I was caught immediately.

The book opens brilliantly, doing exactly what the author was hoping for – drawing the reader in to a new take on magic, and an irreverent take on a hero.

Don’t let the Kindle price fool you, Kelly McCullough’s A Fallen Blade series is going to be one to keep an eye on.

McCullough writes with a grace not usually found these days…

Read All Over Reviews, Teresa, Dec 18 2012

 I liked Aral straight away. He is misanthropic, damaged, despondent, and a reluctant hero. In other words, he’s flawed and that makes him appealing from page one.

Broken Blade is a fast-paced adventure set in an amazingly built world. Looking forward to the second installment.

Whatchamacallit Reviews, Nov 30, 2011

Broken Blade is perfect for a fan of political/hierarchal conspiracy in a fantasy series.

Aral is a fantastic broken character that readers will love to learn more about

McCullough does a fantastic job creating an engaging yet realistic tale of how a once great assassin and religious follow could be broken made into the jack acting outside the law we see today.

…this book isn’t just great characters and intricate political plots, it’s also filled with some heart pounding action.

Fantasy Book Critic, Mihir Wanchoo, Dec 13 2011

 A strong beginning to a new fantasy-mystery hybrid series which proclaims that Kelly McCullough is definitely not a one-series wonder. Broken Blade hits all the right points

 Bared Blade:

 Huntress Reviews, Detra Fitch, July 2012 Five Stars

The character of Aral is intelligent and audacious. Triss is like his voice of reason. This combination makes for an enthralling adventure and actually caused me to lose an entire night of sleep.

This author seems to get better and more original with each book he has published.

Kelly McCullough’s writings are highly addictive and there is no known cure.

Whatchamacallit Reviews July 2012

 Over all, I was really very happy with Bared Blade.

…its full of action, fun characters, and an interesting plot. All in all a fun summer read.

sffbookreviews.blogspot.com

 Kelly McCullough is one of the great idea generators of writers currently being published.

He has a real skill in coming up with awesome ideas that are just to the left of most any other writers I have come across in years.

Well worth the cost to pick it up new in the bookstore in dead tree format.

Crossed Blades:

 Huntress Reviews, Detra Fitch, November 2012 Four Stars

 …the most spectacular thing about this author is his eclectic storytelling.

If you are seeking a fantasy unlike most others, you will not go wrong by choosing any title by this author.

Kelly McCullough’s writing style is indefinable, his imagination is creative and unique, and his plot execution is simply exquisite!

Fresh Fiction, Leanne Davis, January 2013

Kelly McCullough has once again written a magnificent story which deals with love, betrayal and redemption.

Blade Reforged:

Huntress Reviews, Detra Fitch, November 2012 Five Stars

FIVE STARS! Once again Aral and his Shade, Triss, find themselves in the middle of a royal mess – literally. Yet this time it is assassin verses assassin verses assassin. That alone promises readers some high quality entertainment. But Kelly McCullough adds several twists, backbends, and hand springs that only a mind as devious (or demented) as his could possibly conceive. Then the author explains Aral’s shaky strategies in such a way that I, as the reader, forgets that they are wild, dangerous, and suicidal. Instead, I end up believing that they are just short of brilliant. (All eight steps.)

Drawn Blades:

Huntress Reviews, Detra Fitch, November 2012 Five Stars

FIVE STARS! Author Kelly McCullough has an eloquent writing style that conveys intense situations and feelings in such a way that they seem REAL.

…if there are any Hollywood producers out there with an ounce of taste, one of McCullough’s books or series will appear on television or the big screen one day.

Darkened Blade:

Huntress Reviews, Detra Fitch, November 2012 Four and a Half Stars

 FOUR & A HALF STARS! I warn you in advance, stories by Kelly McCullough are highly addictive. All of them!

When I picked up my first novel by this author, I was doomed to clamor for all of them.

He is also contagious. I cannot begin to guess how many people I have infected by simply telling them about what I was reading. But this is one virus you won’t mind catching.

WebMage:

Publishers Weekly Starred Review, WebMage June 26th, page 38:

Remember the Fates, those ancient Greek spinners, weavers and snippers of life’s threads- They’re back in McCullough’s original and outstanding debut, and still ruling destiny–but with their own digital web, based on a server called the Fate Core. . . .

…let loose in McCullough’s delightfully skewed and fully formed world-much like our own, but with magic, paranormally advanced technology and Greek gods

McCullough handles his plot with unfailing invention, orchestrating a mixture of humor, philosophy and programming insights that give new meaning to terms as commonplace as spell checker and esoteric as programming in hex.

This is the kind of title that could inspire an army of rabid fans; it’s a good thing a sequel is planned for 2007.

Romantic Times August 2006 (#270) –Natalie A Luhrs WEBMAGE 4 stars

McCullough has done a fantastic job integrating technology and mythology, and Ravirn is a wonderfully sympathetic protagonist who remains accessible and likable throughout the course of this novel.

Scifi.com’s Science Fiction Weekly August 16, 2006 By D. Douglas Fratz, WebMage

It is complex, well paced, highly creative and, overall, an auspicious debut for McCullough and the new subgenre of cyber-fantasy that he appears to have created.

Greek mythology provides fertile ground for fantasy fiction, and McCullough makes good use of the few selected (all-female) Greek gods who play a role in this novel…

McCullough shows considerable skill for a first novelist in pacing his narrative. The outlandish concept of Greek gods using cyber technology to do their magic and build their realms is kept believable by fast pacing and enough humor to make it work as light fantasy.

WebMage is well worth reading for fans of light fantasy. If McCullough can continue to develop as a writer and continue to build this fantasy world, he just may have created a new fantasy subgenre.

Booklist, WebMage Frieda Murray

…this fast-paced, action-packed yarn is a lot of fun.

McCullough has done an excellent job of weaving myth, magic, IT jargon, and the English language into a bang-up story.

MyShelf.com, September, WebMage

This was just plain fun, combining some of my favorite things – computers and mythology. Greek myth meets cyberpunk…

…plenty of fresh ideas and new directions…

The integration of magic and hacking/programming is really well done.

An impressive debut made up of solid storytelling, plenty of action, interesting characters, and humor, all presented through smooth, addictively readable writing. Highly recommended and I can’t wait for the sequel…

Blogcritics.org Mel Odom (Author) 1st Review 8/11/2006. (Blogcritics.org, NJ.com, Syracuse.com, etc.)

– Kelly McCullough has delivered a grand debut in WebMage. The novel effortlessly blends science and magic…

The action kept me reading way past my bedtime. Every time I thought I had Ravirn safely tucked away for the night, something else would happen and I’d end up reading a few more pages. I finished the book before I’d known it, completely pulled into the story.

Gripping and imaginative, rooted carefully in the real world, WebMage is an exciting chase novel filled with techno jargon the cyber-crowd will enjoy as well as Greek mythology for the fantasy enthusiasts. The first-person narrative rings especially true and drives the tale.

Dialogue between Ravirn and Melchior is sharp and cutting…

Thankfully a second book is already on the way and will be out sometime next year.

WebMage reminded me most of Roger Zelazny’s Princes of Amber books about Corwin. I loved those books when I was growing up, and it’s nice to find someone who can deliver that same sort of magic and characterization. I think McCullough and Raven (as the character becomes known) are in for a nice long run.

Blogcritics.org 2nd review Edwen Davis 10/23/2006

Ravirn and his sidekick Melchoir lead us on a merry adventure in Kelly McCullough’s fantasy novel WebMage.

Take the cyberpunk movement and add a dash of Greek mythology, shake well and you might approach an entertaining adventure – but you must add the genius of Mr. McCullough.

I was enthralled with the relationship of Ravirn, the errant hero of this story, and Melchoir, his web construct familiar.

I would heartily encourage anyone who reads to give WebMage a try and would bet that you won’t want to set it down.

SFRevu.com, WebMage, by Paul Haggerty July  2006

From crashing the magical network that controls reality, to hacking the very database that contains all the threads of life, to treating with the very essence of chaos, Ravirn’s jumps from one point of questionable stability to the next, seeking to stay one step ahead of the divine vengeance that snaps at his heels

WebMage contains a good deal of humor and a highly inventive new way of looking at the universe which combines the magic of old with the computer structures of today.

Over all WebMage is a very enjoyable read.

SFRA #276 (spring) WebMage, Michael Levy

WebMage, Kelly McCullough’s first novel, could easily be by  Zelazny, if the master were still alive and fluent in the language of  contemporary computer programming and hacking.

What follows is a brilliant free for all

This is a fun book.

McCullough is an able stylist

Ravirn himself is an engaging rogue who reminds me a lot of the author.

If you were a fan of the Amber books, I can pretty much guarantee that you’ll enjoy WebMage.

VOYA (Voice of Youth Advocates) Vol 29 #3 August-WebMage Michael Levy (forthcoming)

McCullough’s first novel, written very much in the style of Roger Zelazny’s classic Amber novels, is a rollicking combination of verbal humor, wild adventures, and just plain fun.

Kliatt November 2006 issue (vol. 40, #6); page 29

A unique first novel, this has a charming, fresh combination of mythological, magical, and computer elements…

The tale has various aspects that will enchant many types of readers.

Romance Reviews Today, WEBMAGE, Lisa Baca, (www.romrevtoday.com)

WEBMAGE is a roller coaster ride from page one. The ordinary world is infused with action, adventure, and unexpected surprises mixed in with the Fates and Furies of classic mythology.

Mr. McCullough has reinvented mythology and magic, making it fresh, current, and amusing.

The characters are a great mix of super-humans, deities, and living machines with sarcastic personalities.

WEBMAGE is definitely a fun read, recommended for young adults and grown-ups alike.

Green Man Reviews,  Lory Hess, September 10th 2006, WebMage

A madcap journey across multiple dimensions…

WebMage is inventive, irreverent and fast-paced, strong on both action and humor.

…enjoy WebMage for what it is: a light, entertaining bit of genre bending.

McCullough has created an odd catalog of characters of his own, and clearly had a great time doing it.

FreshFiction.com WebMage, Reviewed by Sue Burke June 30, 2006

Fantastic debut! Totally original fantasy with magic, humor and a hint of romance.

WEBMAGE hosts an original and animated world with its mweb and web goblin familiars and the Greek mythological family

There’s humor and romance and men with swords, web goblins, trolls, evil aunts and meddling grandmothers.

A fine first novel.

FreshFiction.com WebMage, Lexi Carter Posted August 4, 2006

WEBMAGE is an exciting debut novel by Kelly McCullough and engages the reader from the first paragraph with intricate weaving of logical computer lingo and mythology we’ve learned over the ages. Meeting the various gods as hotshot programmers will make many a technophile a very happy camper, uh, reader.

HuntressReviews.com WebMage, Detra Fitch September 4th, 2006

…reading this novel was a MUST!

I am happy to say that I am in no way disappointed. Author Kelly McCullough has taken characters out from the darkness of mythology and brought them into the light of the modern digital age. Deciding to use a child of the Fates is not unique; however, this magical/digitalized twist is.

Out-freaking-standing!

Alternative-Worlds.com, WebMage Review Harriet Klausner 6/6/06 (later at Midwest Review of Books)

Fans who enjoy the fantasy The Warlock In Spite of Himself and its myriad spin-offs will thoroughly appreciate the madcap and whimsical WEBMAGE.

The combination of computer technology with magic spells makes for a whimsical tale of action, adventure, and romance.

Ravirn is a charming hero; an idealist fighting for what he believes is worth battling for inside a comedic quirky fantasy.

Kelly McCullough shows great promise as a fantasy writer and the audience will hope there is a sequel for this spellbinding book.

Apex Magazine’s Online Digest, WebMage Review Mari Adkins, 9/29/06

WebMage is a cyberpunk-fantasy that starts fast, finishes fast, and doesn’t slow down in the middle.

This world is well-developed and very much like our own, but with many different layers of reality filled with magic and Greek gods.

The characters are credible and interesting; McCullough’s humorous yet philosophical narrative is fast-paced; and the cyber-jargon never gets in the way.

The combination of computer technology and magic spells gives WebMage unique flavor and character. The story is so well-written that the first person point of view is unobtrusive and never an obstacle.

WebMage is Kelly McCullough’s first novel and is fun to read! Fans will be happy to know that a sequel is planned for 2007.

Epinions, Rambles.net, WebMage, Chris McCallister

How many genres can fit into a blender, and still taste great?

Fast-paced fun with lots of bizarrely entertaining characters and action.

What to have some fun? Capable of suspending disbelief enthusiastically? If yes to both, prepare to enjoy this book.

…just plain fun to read! The characters are strange but credible and interesting, the writing is very fast-paced, and the cyber-jargon never gets in the way.

…it will confound you into oblivion; if you just go with the flow, suspend disbelief, and allow yourself to enjoy it, you’ll have a blast.

In pace and strangeness, it reminds me of The Hitchhikers’ Guide to the Galaxy. In concepts, it reminds me of Piers Anthony’s series, The Incarnations of Immortality.

What genres are included here? How about: science fiction, cyberpunk, fantasy, modernized mythology, adventure, and a bit of romance and mystery.

This a wild, fun ride. It is perfect reading for any time.

EternalNight.co.uk webzine WebMage, Amanda Kilgore September 2006

Oftentimes, it seems like our computers are magical. In the world created on these pages, they truly are.

There are spells when it seems like original ideas are all used up, but then something like this comes along. The computers alone are an intriguing enough concept to hook you from the start. Though the Calvinist in me might like to argue about what free will is, the book lover in me is delighted.

SciFiChick.com WebMage Jan.07, 2008

McCullough has created a truly unique world that blends science fiction and fantasy – a high-tech, cyber age controlled by magic and gods. .

..this debut is fast-paced with plenty of action and adventure.

Along with the powerful and cruel Fates, the characters and adventure were the highlights of the story.

…I found myself really enjoying this debut novel and looking forward to its sequel, Cybermancy.

Ko-Go Khronicles, WebMage Philip Lees, November 2006 (English newspaper-Crete)

The Greek gods are alive and well and living in cyberspace. The Fates, too, and the Furies. And yes, there really is a goblin lurking inside your computer.

In WebMage, début novelist Kelly McCullough weaves ancient and modern themes into an intricate skein of intrigue…

You don’t have to be a demigod, or even a computer hacker, to find WebMage a fun read. As an off-beat adventure story, it’s an entertaining escapade from start to finish, with plenty of action and strong doses of humour…

MITSFS (MIT’s science fiction society), WebMage, Jake Beal, 2006

I have to hand it to Mr. McCullough: he’s taken a dangerous road and navigated it well.  Science fantasy is, in my opinion, the most treacherous of genres besides satire.

I congratulate Mr. McCullough

He’s also created a fairly fascinating world, somewhat redolent of Zelazny’s Amber universe

…the interface between magical and computer technology definitely tickles my inner geek

Bewildering Stories (.com), WebMage #222, Jerry Wright, 2006

Kelly McCullough has the hacker ethic and the hacker mindset down pat, and the techno-speak, while present, was well done and not obtrusive, and if you like me are into computers, you will find that the combination of mythos magic and technology is great fun.

Ravirn is the literary grand nephew of Corwin of Amber. Not actually, but certainly effectively. If you like the Amber books, you will certainly enjoy Webmage

fantasybookspot.com, WebMage Reviewer: priscillabgoo

Mixing magic, humor, romance, philosophy and techno-speak into the everyday, Kelly McCullough crafts a fast-paced, fantasy adventure that is unique and enjoyable to read.

Alternate dimensions, fairy Rings, computer viruses, and close encounters with the Furies, Chaos and other members of the realms mix with dorm life, midterms and familial obligations to shape author McCullough’s twisted, modern fairy tale.

Ravirn’s world is a fully realized one, and our antihero is both charming and flawed.

scifichick.com WebMage Review Jan, 7th, 2008

McCullough has created a truly unique world that blends science fiction and fantasy – a high-tech, cyber age controlled by magic and gods..

…this debut is fast-paced with plenty of action and adventure.

Ravirn’s web goblin familiar, Melchior, is an exceptionally clever character. Along with the powerful and cruel Fates, the characters and adventure were the highlights of the story. As one who doesn’t read much cyberpunk, I found myself really enjoying this debut novel and looking forward to its sequel, Cybermancy.

Jim Hines (Author of the Jigg the Goblin series and the Princesses series) Jan. 18th, 2009

I loved this book.

What this book is, is a fun read. There’s a love story that has just the right amount of tension. The secondary characters are entertaining, and some are far more complex than they first appear.

I found it a light, irreverent, and entertaining book.

Kimberly Frost (Author of Would-be Witch Jan 2009)

Kelly McCullough’s WebMage, the first in a series, has the most original premise I’ve seen in a very long time. Plus the characters are likable and the action and wit abound. If you want to take a walk on the weird & wild side, read this book.

Mel Odom (Author of more than 100 books) WebMage Amazon Review.

Run For Your Life Thriller

Gripping and imaginative, rooted carefully in the real world, WEBMAGE is an exciting chase novel filled with techno jargon the cyber-crowd will enjoy as well as Greek mythology for the fantasy enthusiasts. The first-person narrative rings especially true and drives the tale. Dialogue between Ravirn and Melchior is sharp and cutting, and sounds like two old friends who constantly pick at each other. The add-on features to the real world are consistent (always a plus in fantasy) and well thought-out.

Fans of Roger Zelazny’s AMBER books, and especially JACK OF SHADOWS, will enjoy this fun romp, which promises to be the first of a series. Packed with action, mythology, humor, and a resonance of true relationships, WEBMAGE is a great read.

Mel Odom (Author of more than 100 books) Own Blog WebMage Review.

Great Read!

This new book by Kelly McCullough reminded me a lot of Roger Zelazny’s AMBER series. Swift and fun first-person narrative…

The action starts out on page one…

…the book is a great tour de force that will keep (you) nailed to the pages.

Cybermancy:

Romantic Times, September 2007, Natalie A. Luhrs, 4 STARS Cybermancy

This is the second book in McCullough’s series that fuses hacking culture with ancient gods, and it’s every bit as charming, clever and readable as its predecessor. His writing style is easy, his characters and his worldbuilding unique and engaging. The story will resonate with sympathetic readers.

VOYA, Michael Levy, Cybermancy. 5Q 4P S A/YA

McCullough combines tropes from cyberpunk, contemporary fantasy, and Greek myth with dazzling proficiency and great good humor, combining scenes that evoke a legitimate sense of wonder with witty repartee and just a touch of sexiness in a manner that recalls both Roger Zelazny’s Amber series and the earlier mythological romps of Thorne Smith. Although not for the prudish, this is a genuinely lovely book.

Huntress Reviews, (huntressreviews.com) Detra Fitch, Sept, 2007, Cybermancy 5 stars

Author Kelly McCullough has the most remarkable writing talent I have ever read, in a myth-fanta-sci-full sort of way. (Yes, that is a real word. Look in the dictionary and see where I penciled it in.) Not satisfied to write a single genre or to use a sub-genre already made, he has created a new template that others will build stories upon in later years. But know this, McCullough is the original and unparalleled. An outstanding addition to this newbie genre!

MyShelf.com, November 2007, Cybermancy

The first book, WebMage (also reviewed on Myshelf.com), was just plain fun.

Cybermancy, however, is no cookie cutter re-hash of the adventures of Ravirn (now aka Raven). It’s more substantive and a lot darker…

The science fantasy concepts behind the book are enjoyably original and well developed, the action fast paced and interesting, but the best ideas in the world won’t work without the right kind of writing to present them, and McCullough nails it. It’s smoothly readable, vivid, and fun – Ravirn’s very good company and you’ve got to love the sort of mind that names a bridge-playing Cerberus’s three heads Mort, Dave and Bob – but also has the substance to handle the deep changes Ravirn and his world are going through, without being heavy handed about it. Highly recommended.

Booklist–Frieda Murray

There’s more story here but enough action to please the fans Ravirn won with WebMage (2006).

Blogcritics Magazine, Mel Odom, November 19 2007

Kelly McCullough continues to rack up big points with his ongoing science/fantasy series

Webmage, was an excellent story, introducing a smart-mouthed quick-thinking magnet for trouble that reminded me a lot of Roger Zelazny’s signature characters.

Like Zelazny’s Corwin of Amber and Jack of Shadows, Ravirn tells his own story in a first-person narrative that explodes onto the pages and keeps moving along at a brisk pace.

I really got into all these balls McCullough kept throwing in the air. There’s always a new reason to keep turning pages. One of the strongest aspects about the books that I enjoy is the fact that McCullough plays fair with the whole Greek mythology.

People who haven’t tried the series really don’t know what they’re missing. McCullough has true world-building skills, a great sense of Greek mythology, and the eye of a thriller writer. The blend of technology and magic is absolutely amazing,

The first-person narrative pulls readers in quickly and introduces them to the action and the world effortlessly. I like the humor, the puns and the jokes, a lot.

I can’t wait to see where the third book takes him. I’m definitely going along for the trip when the book comes out.

SFRevu, Paul Haggerty Sept 27, 2007, Cybermancy

The maxim no good deed goes unpunished seems to be a core philosophy to Ravirn. Ducking, dodging, hacking, and misdirecting, Ravirn and his webgoblin, Melchior, perform the impossible and succeed in sticking it to The Man, in this case the God of Death himself.

Monstersandcritics.com, Sandy Amazeen Oct 15, 2007, Cybermancy

A fun, complex world where technology, Greek mythology, magic and imagination come together in unexpected ways.

McCullough has created an original paranormal series that just keeps getting better with plenty of tongue in cheek spoofs on current technological trends that will appeal to a broad readership.

Midwest Book Review, Harriet Klausner, Cybermancy, Sept 2007

 This zany mixing of computer technology with mythology is a cleverly designed satire in which the audience will have a great time following the antics of Ravirn in the mythological information age.

Readers who appreciate something different will want to read this enjoyable insane sequel to the as much fun and crazy WEBMAGE.

Rambles.net Cybermancy, Chris McCallister

Kelly McCullough continues his great writing, his fascinating fictional world, and his marvelous characters. The puzzles are more complex here, and the danger level is definitely higher. Will everyone survive? There is some definite suspense related to that question, and it is not answered until the very end.

I look forward to the next installment in this series,

Apex Science Fiction and Horror Digest,  Mari Adkins, Cybermancy Dec 12, 2007

McCullough’s humorous narrative is fast-paced as the characters are tossed headlong into the action. The abundance of cyber-jargon never gets in the way of the narrative. The combination of computer technology and magic spells gives Cybermancy unique flavor and character. This follow-up to WebMage delivers and never disappoints.

MITSFS (MIT’s science fiction society), Cybermancy, Jake Beal, 2007

..all of the good things about Mr. McCullough’s writing that surprised me about WebMage surprised me again as I read Cybermancy.

SciFiChick.com Cybermancy Mar.27, 2008

…fusing Greek mythology and science fiction, this unique subgenre keeps up all of the fast-paced adventure as before.

Infused with plenty of humor, this series is a lot of fun with many unique and entertaining characters.

CodeSpell:

Publishers Weekly, Week of May 5th 2008

 In McCullough’s taut third book in the Ravirn series (after WebMage and Cybermancy), Necessity, sentient creator of the mweb, has fallen victim to a virus, and all of reality is at stake.

A hint of cyberpunk, a dollop of Greek mythology and a sprinkle of techno-magic bake up into an airy genre mashup. Lots of fast-paced action and romantic angst up the ante as Ravirn faces down his formidable foes.

Booklist–Frieda Murray 2008

McCullough balances the seriousness and the slapstick nearly perfectly.–Frieda Murray

Romantic Times, June 2008, #292, Natalie Lurhs

This third book featuring hacker extraordinaire Ravirn is every bit of a fast-paced, energetic, page-turner as its predecessors.  Ravirn continues to be a fascinating protagonist, and the chaotic twists of the plot carry the reader through to the end.

SFRevu.com, May 27, 2008, Review by Paul Haggerty

Codespell is one long adrenalin rush, with a few small pauses for Ravirn to heal from his near-fatal brushes with the movers and shakers of the universe, all while trying to figure out how to survive the next inevitable encounter.

Politics takes on a whole new complexion when it’s practiced by the immortals of Greek mythology who never eat breakfast without examining the pros and cons of bacon vs. sausages from all angles first.

Huntress Reviews June 6, 2008, Detra Fitch

I do not recall the last time I have loved a series of books as I have this one. Author Kelly McCullough + the new genre he has inspired = pure genius!

FreshFiction.com Reviewed by Leanne Davis July 18, 2008

Imaginative, fascinating, with a lot of adventure thrown in, Mr. McCullough has followed his first two books with a worthy sequel. CODESPELL will keep the reader on edge…

Epinions.com June 15th,  2008, Chris McCallister

…he (McCullough) just knows how to write. The pace is fast and furious but, despite the unreality of his universe, it never gets confusing, as the story remains faithful to the world the author has created. The characters are also credible and developed well.

McCullough has been able to create a large cast of characters that are truly different one from the others.

…the author makes it easy to achieve that suspension of disbelief, by keeping this story, and the entire series, internally consistent. More important, though, Kelly McCullough has kept the books fun, exciting, unpredictable, and interesting. CodeSpell is a fine example of using good writing to create something fresh, new, and different. Keep it up!

Alternative Worlds, April 16th, 2008, Harriet Klausner

This is a fun to read fantasy filled with irreverent witticisms, plenty of action, and a mind boggling romantic subplot.

Ravirn has a dry wit and a streak of kindness that at times gets him in trouble but endears him to reader…

MITSFS (MIT’s science fiction society), CodeSpell, Jake Beal, 2008

CodeSpell is a solid addition to a surprisingly fresh series with more subtlety than it first appears.

MythOS:

Bitten By Books, Jackie, October 12 2010

If Neil Gaiman sparked my love for Norse mythology, Kelly McCullough ignited the bonfire with MythOS.

This has to be one of the most quotable books I’ve ever read. The lingo, the mythology, the pure genius that went into this book is a testament to the author’s ability.

Myshelf.com, Kim Malo, Reviewed 2009

I love this series. The integration of classical mythology and computers is richly depicted, not just a surface code as a language for spells.

Raivirn’s really good company. The stories themselves are packed with color, action and drama, along with plenty of both wit and humor. The world-building is solid and remarkably vivid, while the characters are believable and people you care deeply about…

Highly recommended.

Huntress Reviews, June 2009, Detra Fitch

FOUR AND A HALF STARS!

As always, this author writes a smooth flowing tale that entices the imagination and leaves me hungry for more.

Rambles.net, Chris McCallister

As with the previous books in this series, the action is non-stop, the characters are not only well-developed but are also evolving and the plot is complex but coherent.

The new characters, namely the Norse deities, are fascinating and three-dimensional.

The writing remains as clear and as crisp and as well-paced as in the previous books. There are several surprises, but they all make sense

NYC Resistor, the hacker collective

MythOS is the fourth installment in the masterful Web Mage book series written by Kelly McCullough.

As you are introduced to this magical world of web goblins and code spells, you find yourself gripping the pages like the last stable purchase holding you to your mundane reality and saving you from the adventure within.

MythOS is a real gem in the series

SpellCrash:

Skunk Cat Book Reviews, K.C. Shaw, May 22, 2010

The plotting in these books is excellent.

Ravirn started off as a likable character in the first book, and he’s become more complex with each book without losing his likability.

Three Crow Press, June 7, 2010

This series is one of those few urban fantasy novels that is highly original.

The book is filled with action and suspense. The world building is awesome, the plot intense and there is plenty of pathos and humor.

This series is a keeper

Huntress Reviews, Detra Fitch, May 16 2010

Author Kelly McCullough seems to get better with every story he publishes.

Though the plot is intense and the story flows at a fast pace, it never feels overwhelming. The writing style comes across as both simple and elegant.

Short Stories:

Author Ed McKeown on Interface Pattern—(Fantastic Stories of the Imagination anthology 2012)

This is a crime story with an interestingly dark protagonist who may identify a little too much with the other side. Believe me, you will feel the impact of the end of this piece.

VR bites hard in this piece.

SFRevu.com May 2006 by Sam TomainoFimbulDinner (Weird Tales Magazine)

Fimbuldinner: The Last Supper by Kelly McCullough is a hilarious tale. A King reluctantly lets a magician he’s had trouble with before host a huge dinner in his palace. What happens is distinctly unexpected but a real hoot.

Baryon 82 baryon-online reviewed by Barry Hunter—The Sharp End (Writers of the Future, Volume XVII)

The Sharp End by Kelly David McCullough, perhaps the best of the group, is the story of the last NASA astronaut.
Washington Post Arts & Living By Peter Carlson Tuesday, March 14, 2006; Page C01 – FimbulDinner (Weird Tales Magazine)

Fimbuldinner: The Last Supperthe story in which Plato watches the food fight of the gods — is a zippy, zany romp: There was something menacing about her. He couldn’t really put his finger on what it was, but the necklace of skulls was high on the list.

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